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Standard in Appraising the Chinese Clivias

China Clivia  Mr Cui [Font Size 16 14 12]

During the rein of the last emperor (Pu Yi, the 10th  ruler of Qing Dynasty), clivia was introduced  to  Chinese  people.  As  time  goes  on,  clivia  became  a  revered  symbol  in China.

Unlike breeders of other countries, Chinese are more concerned with the foliage than the flowers. The Chinese clivias are noted for its short, bright, broad, rigid, thick and round  tip  leaves  shaped  like  a  fan. 

To resolve any inconsistencies in judging a Chinese clivia, the China Clivia Association (CCA) in 1999 formulated a standard or guidelines in appraising or judging the quality of a Chinese clivia. The standards of appreciation of Chinese clivia are outlined as follows:

1.   Brightness - the brighter the better;
2.   Fineness - the fine the better;
3.   Rigidity (bending strength of entire leaf) - the stiffer the better;
4.   Thickness - the thicker the better;
5.   Vein - the best veins should be rough, convex and protruding;
6.   Leaf Color – the lighter the better, transparent and clear, bicolor shades are the best, with the best having a ratio of green and white;
7.   Length to Width Ratio - the best ratio is about 2:1 to 3:1;
8.   Stalk Shape - the best shape is symmetrical leaf base, fan shape, with no brown edges or spaces;
9. Seat Shape;
10. Head Shape - each leaf tip should be round, a pointed or sharp tip is bad.

Standard
Good
Bad
Brightness
 
 
Fineness
 
 
Rigidity
 
 
Thickness
 
 
Vein
 
 
Leaf Color
 
 
Length to Width Ratio
 
 
Stalk Shape
 
 
Seat Shape
 
 

Head Shape

 
 



Hited:
Mr Cui


Ten Standards in Appreciating Chinese Clivias
     
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